Herpes Virus Infection

Herpes virus infection is caused by the reactivation of varicella-zoster (VZV) dormant in the sensory ganglia following primary infection. This is a painful blister or rash on the affected area as the virus travels along sensory nerve fibers. The annual incidence of herpes virus is similar in Asia Pacific, North America, and Europe at 3 to 5 cases per 1000 person-years (PY). The incidence of herpes viruses increases markedly with age and Immunosuppression, affecting more than 50% of people over the age of 85.

Diabetic patients are susceptible to herpes virus infection due to decreased cell-mediated immunity (CMI) during this process and the reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is generally recognized as a prothrombotic disease associated with altered innate or adaptive immunity and endothelial dysfunction secondary to inflammation. Therefore, diabetes mellitus with chronic comorbidities or associated vascular complications is considered a major preventable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Diabetic patients are two to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease than non-diabetic patients. Patients are at increased risk of developing the herpes virus if they have two or more comorbidities. On the other hand, herpes zoster was an independent risk factor for VZV vascular lesions such as stroke, transient ischemic attack, and myocardial infarction. However, few studies have examined the association between shingles risk and diabetes-related micro vascular disease in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).

The aim of this study was to determine whether the risk of herpes zoster in diabetic patients increases with the co-occurrence of coronary artery disease or with other associated microvascular diseases. In addition, we assessed the effect of anti-diabetic drugs on the risk of herpes viruses in these patients using data from a national database in Taiwan.

Herpes Triggers Diabetes Patients

A common herpes virus can trigger diabetes in people with diabetes. People infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) may have a 50% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Previous research has shown that hepatitis C virus infection is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. However, it is also possible that infection with other viruses can make people more susceptible to the disease.

The current study tested HSV-1 infection in 206 participants with type 2 diabetes and a control group of 1,360 participants without diabetes. All participants were negative for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus, the researchers found. The findings showed that 46 percent of the diabetic patients were infected with HSV-1, compared with 36 percent of the control group. In a Diabetes Care (February 2005) report, researchers showed that people with diabetes accounted for 16 percent of the HSV-1-infected population, but only 11 percent of them were free of the virus.

Why Diabetes makes it Easy to Contract Herpes

Most people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes have a weakened immune system, making it easier to get infections and thus harder to fight off. Because of this, people with diabetes are more susceptible to viral infections, including herpes simplex virus (HSV). HSV is one of the most common and easily contracted STDs, and people with diabetes can contract HSV if they are not careful with someone who is already infected.

Herpes and Type 1 Diabetes The herpes virus remains in the body’s nerve cells indefinitely, regardless of whether the person has frequent or infrequent attacks. While these can be triggered by lifestyle changes (eg, stress, menstruation), having a compromised immune system in diabetics puts them at constant risk of flare-ups.

How to Prevent Herpes in terms of Diabetic Patients?

The best protection against HSV in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes is prevention. While a weakened immune system can make it easier to catch the virus, there are steps you can take to avoid it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends avoiding specific contact with infected people as a best precaution, including:

• Have vaginal, anal, or oral

• Kiss

• Shared drinks or cutlery

If you have type 1 or 2 diabetes and are concerned about your risk of contracting the herpes virus, visit https://herpescure.in Healthcare professionals are available 365 days a year to educate you about the risks and testing for STDs. Stop by today!

cure for herpes simplex

Cure for herpes simplex virus with herpes cure website. Herpes zoster sometimes referred to as shingles, is a common nerve illness brought on by a virus that presents as a painful blister rash anywhere on the body. Even after the rash has healed, the pain may linger for months. The virus is the same as the one that causes chickenpox. Throughout a person’s lifetime, the virus stays latent in the body and may reawaken years or even decades later to produce a zoster.

Who is at risk of developing herpes shingles?

It is more likely that someone who has had chickenpox would acquire shingles.

Due to compromised defenses (such as people with cancer, HIV, organ transplant recipients, or those receiving chemotherapy).

  • Who is in distressed condition?
  • Who has reached or is above the age of 50?
  • People who are ill
  • Who has experienced trauma?

Infected individuals will not develop symptoms until the chickenpox virus has completely replicated within their bodies. The virus stays put in the dorsal root ganglion of your spinal nerve. The vast majority of the population has no idea the virus even exists in their body. Stress is a common precipitating factor in herpes virus resurgence; however, the exact cause is still unknown.

Symptoms

Shingles are characterized by a red, itchy rash, as the name suggests. Shingles often affect just one side of the body or one side of the face at a time. Even if you haven’t seen any signs of the rash yet, itching, burning, or tingling in the areas where it will appear may irritate you.

The effects of the sickness on the nervous system might last months or even years. Long-term nerve soreness becomes more common as you get older. There have been reports of searing, throbbing, aching, or stinging nerve discomfort.

Shingles may cause conjunctivitis of the eyes.

One of the first signs of herpes simplex virus is:

  • Fever 
  • Chill bumps
  • Worn out.
  • Sensitivity towards light
  • I went to the doctor because I was experiencing stomach pains.
  • The skin might itch or feel like it’s burning in one area alone.
  • The skin may have a little, raised rash; 
  • The affected area of the skin will be darkened
  • Fluid-filled sores that eventually scab over.

 Prevention is better than cure. Go for vaccination

You can cure for herpes simplex virus with a simple and effective vaccination. Getting vaccinated is the most effective way to reduce the chance of developing shingles or experiencing long-term pain if one does get shingles. Vaccination against zoster is recommended for all healthy adults 50 and older, as well as those 19 and older with compromised immunity owing to disease or treatment. Even if a person has already had chickenpox, the infection might recur. Those who have already had chickenpox are still able to get a vaccine to prevent future outbreaks. Although there is no specific time restriction for receiving the varicella vaccination after having chickenpox, you should often wait until the outbreak has subsided before receiving the vaccine. The vaccination regimen should be discussed with a medical professional.

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